COVID-19 Hub

KSB Hospital is committed to safety during the COVID-19 pandemic and keeping our community protected and informed. At KSBCOVIDHub.com, you can find the latest data on how the pandemic is affecting our region. We hope this will serve as a useful source of truth for the Sauk Valley.

Stay safe. Stay healthy. Stay smart. Together, we will see this through.

Local COVID-19 Data

Local Vaccine Updates

Data Trends

Daily New Cases

Daily Number of Cases by County

Positivity Percentages

Daily Percentage of Positive Results

STATUS:

Warning Level

Total Confirmed Cases and Deaths by County

Lee County

3685

Total Cases

68

Deaths

Ogle County

5750

Total Cases

88

Deaths

Whiteside County

6846

Total Cases

210

Deaths

Current KSB Inpatients with COVID Symptoms:

8

Vaccine Information

Use of the Johnson & Johnson (J & J) Covid-19 Vaccine on Hold

Earlier this week,  State and Federal health authorities directed medical providers to temporarily stop the administration of the J & J product  after a small number of individuals developed a rare and severe type of blood clot after receiving the vaccine.  Here are some important details to know about the situation:

  1. The “pause” on administering the J & J vaccine is a short term safety precaution while physicians and scientists work to determine whether the vaccine played a role in the health problems affecting  6 individuals out of the 7 million  doses that have been administered.
  2. While research on the J & J product proceeds,  it should not deter eligible recipients  from continuing to receive Covid 19 vaccinations using the Pfizer or Moderna products which have been thoroughly investigated by the FDA and granted emergency use authorization.   In total, over 120 million Americans have received Covid vaccinations in the past few months.
  3. Vaccines distributed in Illinois have overwhelmingly been provided by Pfizer and Moderna,  and as such,  the availability of shots is not expected to be materially impacted by the J & J pause.
  4. Individuals with questions or concerns about receiving any Covid 19 vaccination should reach out to their healthcare provider.
  5. For those individuals that have received the J & J vaccine, within the last 3 weeks,  it is recommended that you contact a health care professional if you develop a severe headache,  abdominal pain,  or shortness of breath.

April 19, 2021

Current Phase: PHASE 1B+

Based on the Illinois Department of Health COVID-19 vaccination plan, vaccines are being distributed in a phased approach. In collaboration with the Lee and Ogle County Health Departments, KSB Hospital has administered over 4,500 shots to employees and area residents in order to protect them from illness and the spread of the virus.

Beginning April 12, the “phases” will be eliminated and all Illinois residents over the age of 16 will be eligible for vaccination. Local Health Departments are now working through their existing appointment lists, while at the same time, developing the processes that will be established to sign up for vaccinations when the new eligibility begins.

For the latest information on signing up for a vaccination appointment, please visit your county website by choosing one of the options below.

Vaccine Phases

Phase 1b (current phase)

  • Persons aged 65+ years
  • Essential Frontline Workers
  • First Responders
    • Police
    • Firefighters (including volunteer)
    • National guard acting in the capacity of a first responder. (Note: EMS is included in Health Care Personnel)
  • Food & Agriculture
    • Meat processing plants workers
  • Transportation
    • Transit and trucking workers
  • Corrections Officers
  • Educators
  • Adults under age 65 with medical conditions that increase the risk for severe COVID-19:
    • Obesity
    • Diabetes
    • Pulmonary diseases
    • Smoking
    • Heart conditions (including hypertension)
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • Cancer
    • Solid Organ Transplant
    • Sickle Cell Disease
    • Pregnancy
    • Persons with Disability

Phase 1c

  • Adults under age 65 with medical conditions that increase the risk for severe COVID-19:
    • Obesity
    • Diabetes
    • Pulmonary diseases
    • Smoking
    • Heart conditions (including hypertension)
    • Chronic kidney disease
    • Cancer
    • Solid Organ Transplant
    • Sickle Cell Disease
    • Pregnancy
    • Persons with Disability
  • Other essential workers
    • Transportation & logistics
    • Water & wastewater
    • Food service
    • Shelter and housing (contruction)
    • Finance
    • Information technology & communications
    • Energy
    • Legal
    • Media and public safety
    • Public health workers

Phase 2

  • It is possible that Phase 2 will include the rest of the population aged 16+ years old.
  • ACIP will make specific age recommendations as data becomes available.

Phase 3

Possible groups could include:

  • Children under the age of 18.

This is dependent upon a pediatric vaccine approval/availability

Phase 1a (ended)

  • Long-term care residents
  • Long-term care staff
  • Healthcare personnel
    • Hospital healthcare
    • Non-hospital healthcare
    • Other Congregate Care

Vaccine Scheduling by County

To schedule a vaccine appointment please visit your county’s website:

Lee County Residents:

Vaccinations for Phase 1b residents by the Lee County Health Department are being offered now.

Sign up at lchd.com »

Ogle County Residents:

Vaccinations for Phase 1b residents by the Ogle County Health Department are being offered now.

Sign up at oglecounty.org »

Whiteside County Residents:

Vaccinations for Phase 1b residents by the Whiteside County Health Department are being offered now.

Sign up at whitesidehealth.org »

Frequently Asked Questions

Will there be enough vaccines for everyone?

At first, there will be a limited supply of the COVID-19 vaccine which means that not everyone will be able to be vaccinated right away. This supply will increase in 2021 and eventually, everyone will be able to receive the vaccine.

That is why the federal government began investing in select vaccine manufacturers to help increase their ability to quickly make and distribute a large amount of the COVID-19 vaccine. This will allow the United States to start with as much vaccine as possible and continually increase the supply in the weeks and months to follow.

Why should I receive a vaccine?

The vaccine is the most effective tool for ending this global pandemic. We encourage all our associates, as well as all members of our community, to consider a vaccine. Since the start of the pandemic, caregivers have been at risk for contracting the coronavirus in their work caring for patients and the communities they serve. Numerous nurses, physicians and other clinicians around the country have contracted the virus, and some have died.

Why would a vaccine be needed if we can do other things, like social distance and wear masks, to prevent the virus from spreading?

Vaccines work with an individual’s immune system to prepare your body to fight the virus if exposed. Social distancing and wearing a mask will help reduce your chance of being exposed to the virus and spreading it to others.

Can I get COVID-19 from the vaccine?

No, it is a myth that you’ll get COVID-19 from the COVID-19 vaccine. You will not get COVID-19 from the vaccine because it does not use the live virus. Both Pfizer and Moderna vaccines utilize a new type of vaccine, known as mRNA, which introduces a genetic code the body can use to make its own viral protein to induce an immune response to fight off the coronavirus.

It typically takes a few weeks for the body to build immunity after vaccination. It is possible to become infected with the virus that causes COVID-19 just before or just after vaccination and get sick—this is because the vaccine has not had enough time to provide protection.

Local, Helpful Information

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